Spiders' World

Do you fear spiders? Or do you like spiders and such things like that? I got you a list with some information about spiders with names and pictures, I hope you'll enjoy it.

Wolf Spiders:

 

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Wolf spiders are Lycosideau Family members. They are robust and agile hunters with a great eyesight. They usually live in solitude and hunt alone, and they don't spin webs.

 

Widow Spider:

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Widow Spider, or Latrodectus, is a highly distributed genus of spiders with a great number of species that together are referred to as true widows. This group is composed of those often loosely called black widow spider, brown widow spiders, and similar spiders. 

 

Jumping Spider:

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Jumping spiders are a bunch of spiders which constitute the family Salticidae. As of 2019, this family contained over 600 described genera and over 6000 described species, making it the largest family of spiders at 13% of all species.

 

Huntsman Spiders:

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Huntsman spiders, they are family Sparassidae members, they are known by this name because of their speed and the way they hunt. Also, they are called giant crab spiders because of their size and appearance. Larger species sometimes are referred to as wood spiders, because of their preference for woody places. 

Antspiders:

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Ant spiders are members of the family Zodariidae. They are small to medium-sized eight-eyed spiders found in all tropical and subtropical regions of South America, Africa, Madagascar, Australia-New Guinea, New Zealand, Arabia and the Indian subcontinent.

 

Lynx Spider:

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Lynx spider is a family of araneomorph spiders which were first described by Tamerlan Thorell in 1870. Most species make little use of webs, instead spending their lives as hunting spiders on plants. Many species frequent flowers in particular, ambushing pollinators, much as crab spiders do.

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